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This is how East Elm Street, now East High, looked in the 1950s when I was a boy. The first building on the left is the original Middlefield Bank building with a new front addition. Because the original building sat farther back from the road, a ramp was built in the new front addition to get to the teller area. It actually made the bank premises occupy the second floor. Dorothy Kimball’s Beauty Shop, and later Jim’s Barber Shop occupied a small space on the first floor. Coming down the street is Middlefield Hardware owned by Charlie Harrington. I can remember going in and Charlie would know every piece of inventory in the store and just where to find it. Sometimes it meant going down the creaky steps into the basement and Charlie would dig around in some dark dusty corner and would always come up with what you were looking for. Next is Lorson’s Golden Dawn Grocery Store where I got my first real job when I was 13. I worked for Clarence Lorson after school on Thursday, Friday and all day Saturday for 60 cents an hour. There was also a restaurant in the basement called the Nibble Nook where you could get a light lunch. Edith Ritchie’s Dry Goods Store was next where you could get notions and material and at one time the ladies of town could buy a dress. Middlefield 5¢ & $1.00 store was next and was owned by Maude Lorson, wife of Clarence. She was later joined in the business by her two sons Earl and Rich Warne. Times were certainly different then. All of the retail stores were owned by people who actually worked in them and everyone would close for the afternoon on Wednesday. Middlefield Bank is the only business in town that has maintained that tradition for more than 115 years. I have many fond memories of growing up in this time.
This is how East Elm Street, now East High, looked in the 1950s when I was a boy. The first building on the left is the original Middlefield Bank building with a new front addition. Because the original building sat farther back from the road, a ramp was built in the new front addition to get to the teller area. It actually made the bank premises occupy the second floor. Dorothy Kimball’s Beauty Shop, and later Jim’s Barber Shop occupied a small space on the first floor. Coming down the street is Middlefield Hardware owned by Charlie Harrington. I can remember going in and Charlie would know every piece of inventory in the store and just where to find it. Sometimes it meant going down the creaky steps into the basement and Charlie would dig around in some dark dusty corner and would always come up with what you were looking for. Next is Lorson’s Golden Dawn Grocery Store where I got my first real job when I was 13. I worked for Clarence Lorson after school on Thursday, Friday and all day Saturday for 60 cents an hour. There was also a restaurant in the basement called the Nibble Nook where you could get a light lunch. Edith Ritchie’s Dry Goods Store was next where you could get notions and material and at one time the ladies of town could buy a dress. Middlefield 5¢ & $1.00 store was next and was owned by Maude Lorson, wife of Clarence. She was later joined in the business by her two sons Earl and Rich Warne. Times were certainly different then. All of the retail stores were owned by people who actually worked in them and everyone would close for the afternoon on Wednesday. Middlefield Bank is the only business in town that has maintained that tradition for more than 115 years. I have many fond memories of growing up in this time.
This picture shows the entire east side of East Elm Street (East High) as it looks today. Middlefield Bank bought all of the properties in the late 1980s and 90s and redeveloped it as a modern, up-to-date shopping area.
This picture shows the entire east side of East Elm Street (East High) as it looks today. Middlefield Bank bought all of the properties in the late 1980s and 90s and redeveloped it as a modern, up-to-date shopping area.

 

 

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