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My Time with the Navy Seals

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The U.S. Army jump school practicing jumps from a 250 ft. high tower in Fort Benning, Georgia. (MP Photo/Joe Novak)

By Joe Novak

I wish I had what it took to be a Navy Seal. I don’t, but I did spend three weeks with a dozen of them while attending jump school at Ft. Benning Georgia. To say it was a privilege would be an understatement.

The U S Army jump school is not a place for the timid, undisciplined or unmotivated. These were the three toughest weeks I spent in the military and getting my wings was a proud moment. Getting through this training took 90 percent mental attitude and 10 percent physical ability. A drill instructor told me, “It’s mind over matter. I don’t mind and you don’t matter.” The DI’s loved to make grown men cry. They were going to “break you” and they were especially tough on Navy Seals. One of the Seals told me that jump school was a walk in the park compared to their standard training, which makes one wonder what kind of “metal” these guys are made of. 

Dropping you for 10 pushups was commonplace and “give me 10” was heard every few minutes all day long for offenses as minute as an eye blink at the wrong time. When a Seal was dropped for 10 he would yell out “Seal Team” and every Seal would drop for 10; doing several hundred pushups a day was not uncommon for this elite group of men.

If this wasn’t impressive enough, week number two starting off with a bang – literally! Week two is tower week where they hoist you up 250 feet in the air dangling from a parachute and drop you. This is where what you learned the previous week came into practice doing PLF’s; (parachute landing falls) trying not to hit the ground like a sack of Idaho’s. 

As we approached the towers, small explosives were detonated allowing two 5 X 8 bed sheet banners (5 sheets by 8 sheets) to unroll from the towers. On one of the banners was the seal team frog mascot and on the other it read, “Seal Team.” Keep in mind that these towers are 250 feet high. This was accomplished in total darkness and no Seal missed hourly bed check. To say I was impressed is an understatement. 

This was a small example of why the Navy Seals are the world’s most effective operators. Most Americans give little thought that someplace in the world at any given hour, some American service person is putting their life on the line so that those of us at home don’t need to. The fact that we are living in a free country has nothing to do with the buffoons in Congress and everything to do with our military.

To find out what Joe would do, e-mail questions to editorial@middlefieldpost.com. Joe has 20-some years experience in manufacturing and says that as a small business owner, he found that you either learn how to solve a problem yourself or pay to have it done. Joe’s articles are his opinion and are only intended as a guide. Please consult an expert when in doubt.

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